Leap Second handling via Leap Smearing

What is a leap second? Because the earth’s rotation is gradually slowing, approximately every 18 months’ time we need to add an “extra” second to the clock. We must account for this second to keep accurate time. Although one second doesn’t seem like a big deal, over time those seconds would add up. It’s best… Read More.

Leap Second 2016 is fast approaching

There will be a Leap Second on December 31st at 23:59:59 pm UTC. Are you ready? This 2015 Bloomberg article is a good overview of how some different organizations handle the leap second. Make sure that your instance of  Network Time Protocol (NTP) is up to date. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-06-28/with-61-seconds-in-a-minute-markets-brace-for-trouble Network Time Foundation needs funding to get… Read More.

Leap second is no Y2K bug

June 30, 2015 by Solomon Israel, CBC News Most days last for 86,400 seconds, but June 30, 2015, will last for 86,401. Because the Earth doesn’t rotate at a constant speed, scientists have taken to adding the occasional leap second to keep international timekeeping in line with the world’s super-accurate atomic clocks. Why we’re turning our clocks ever-so-slightly back The last… Read More.

NTF Releases ntp 4.2.8p3 Including Leap Second Updates

June 29, 2015 – Network Time Foundation has released its next stable release of NTP, 4.2.8p3, which includes a fix for a minor security issue, many bug fixes, and some new features including leap second experimental options. Here are some highlights: –2837 makes it easier to distribute time packets with the right priority settings on… Read More.